Unity Collision Box Macro Extension

Since my tablet is barely inoperable and I’m on winter break now, I can’t work on my comic at the moment. A new tablet should be one of my Christmas presents. So until then, I decided to play around with unity some more.

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After being used to Unreal Engine 4’s collision geometry procedures, coming back to unity led to frustration. In Unity, to make collision geometry for a complex room, I had to drag in new game objects for each “piece” of the room, line it up, remove the rendering component, and add a box collider component. That becomes very time consuming for large levels with multiple room pieces.

I had the idea to program my own editor extension that imitates UE4’s collision object generator. I model the room following the same process I would for a UE4 asset, making collision boxes as part of the model with a standard prefix “UBX_”. Then my script will recursively flip through all the sub-objects in the model’s hierarchy and if the prefix matches “UBX_”, it will remove the rendering component and add a box collider.

Editor Extension Script C# (Unity 4+):

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From Greatness to Dust and Back Again: Chapter 1 (introduction)

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I just completed the first issue of my comic series, “From Greatness to Dust and Back Again”.

Check it out on tumblr!

Summary: “What is it to be human?” A science-fiction and philosophical exploration into what constitutes as a sentient being. Life, love, death, terror, and everything in between. Follow a young Lisovyek man named Aleks as he finds his place in the world- an alternate universe populated by species of genetically modified animals.

Keep an eye out for the next issue in a few weeks. If you like it, be sure to follow the blog so you’ll never miss an update.

BEHIND THE SCENES:

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(a final draft board for one of the pages in my first issue)

Since this is my artist dev blog, I’d like to explain a little behind my process. After putting together my plot outline for the entire series, I started by fleshing out each issue with more elaborate detail. For this issue in particular, I started with the text, “What is it to be human? … ” and then sketched out rough ideas for each board. I then consulted my friend who is much more familiar with comic panels and composition with help on how to refine each board’s layout. I moved to the final “draft” pass, and then a completed paintover. The entire process ranges from a week to two weeks for a single issue.